Tag Archives: Southern Foodways

“Cornbread Nation 5” is Fresh Out of the Oven

1 Mar

Cornbread Nation 5
The Best of Southern Food Writing

Edited by Fred W. Sauceman
General Editor John T. Edge

A generous helping of new food writing that explores southern foodways

Reviews

Cornbread Nation 5 is a mouth-watering read that evokes the smells of exotic foods like fried Coke, paddlefish, and livermush, as well as the familiar aroma of field peas, corn, and sweet potato pie. . . . Fred Sauceman has edited a truly historic body of reflections on southern food that will be read with gusto by all who love to eat. And eat they must after relishing this beautiful book.”
William Ferris, author of Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues

“Sam the Tamale Man, Mama Sugar, Doe’s Eat Place, North Carolina livermush, Georgia chicken mull, Jelly Roll Morton, Sazeracs and Micheladas—the very names of eats, drinks, jazzmen, and cooks are riffs on the heard melodies of culture and cuisine. In the South, eating, like writing, celebrates the fact that there’s no place like home.”
Betty Fussell, author of Raising Steaks: The Life and Times of American Beef

Description

The fifth volume in this popular series from the Southern Foodways Alliance spans the food cultures of the South. Cornbread Nation 5, lovingly edited by accomplished food writer Fred W. Sauceman, celebrates food and the ways in which it forges unexpected relationships between people and places. In this collection of more than seventy essays and poems, we read about the food that provides nourishment as well as a sense of community and shared history.

Essays examine Nashville’s obsession with hot chicken and the South’s passion for congealed foods. There are stories of green tomatoes frying over a campfire in the Cumberland Mountains of Tennessee and tea cakes baking for Easter in Louisiana.

In a chapter on immigrant cooking, writers visit the Mississippi Delta where a Chinese family fries pork rinds in a wok and a Lebanese restaurant serves baklava alongside coconut cream pie. Alan Deutschman, a self-described “Jewish Yankee,” chronicles his search for the perfect country ham. Barbara Kingsolver extols on the joys of eating sustainably. Sara Roahen writes a veritable love letter to the venerable New Orleans Sazerac. Kevin Young delights with his “Ode to Chicken,” and Donna Tartt treats us to what else but bourbon.

Cornbread Nation 5 is a feast for the eyes, and if you’re not hungry or thirsty when you pick up this book, you will be when you put it down.

http://www.ugapress.org/index.php/books/cornbread_nation5/0/1

SFA Summer Field Trip Motors to Bristol

20 Apr

mountain

Please read this message from our friends at SFA —

Join us as we explore the foodways of the northeastern reaches of Tennessee and the southwestern reaches of Virginia. Bristol, which straddles the two states and is known as the birthplace of country music, will be our headquarters.

We begin on THURSDAY EVENING with an Infield Supper at Bristol Motor Speedway. We’ve got all-access passes to the pits and permission to run cars on the high bank oval. We’ll enjoy hickoried sandwiches from Larry Proffitt’s fabled Ridgewood Barbecue, and brown whiskey.
 
FRIDAY means morning expeditions. Among the choices are trout cleaning and cookery, a winery tour, a pickle beancooking class by Sheri Castle, and a barbecue pit tutorial by Larry Proffitt. But first a Fred Sauceman lecture on local food and music. And a breakfast of stack cakes, from Jill Sauceman’s family recipe. Lunch is at the Burger Bar, where Hank Williams ate his last meal. We’ll hear a talk by Ted Olson on the Bristol Sessions. Come evening we tour a photography exhibit by Larry Smith and attend a re-staging of the “Farm and Fun Radio Hour.” At the Bristol Train Station, we’ll enjoy a trout supper, prepared by Sean Brock, a native of nearby Wise, Virginia, now cooking at McCrady’s in Charleston, South Carolina.
 
SATURDAY starts with a butterscotch pie breakfast from Blackbird Bakery. And a trip to the Abingdon, Virginia, Farmers Market with Anthony Flaccavento of Appalachian Sustainable Development. Following is a history tour of the Barter Theater. And our annual Anson Mills lunch, cooked by Karen Urie and John Shields of Town House in nearby Chilhowie, Virginia, served at Anthony Flaccavento’s farm. That night we travel to the Carter Fold, the cradle of American folk music. We’ll eat soup beans and chicken salad, prepared by the descendants of Mother Maybelle Carter. And homemade chocolate cake. We’ll dance to the Larkin Family band. Back at home, we’ll toast the weekend with a down home digestif of herbal Dr. Enuf and moonshine.
Cost for the weekend is $285 for members, $315 for nonmembers, inclusive of all lectures and meals.

SFA Explores Louisville’s Barroom Culture

5 Sep

Louisville is awash in bourbon. And beer. It’s a drinking person’s town, due in no small part to the state’s bourbon heritage, the city’s nickname-namesake brewery, Falls City, and that little horse race called the Kentucky Derby. But there’s more to this town than brown liquor, local breweries, and racetracks. This is where, it’s said, the Old-Fashioned was invented. It’s where Al Capone dodged the law during Prohibition, ducking out of the Seelbach Hotel through secret passageways. And it’s where barkeeps plied their customers with rolled oysters and bean soup to keep them coming back. Louisville’s private clubs, hotel bars, and neighborhood taverns are rich with drinking history and lore. But they’re also rife with innovation and talk of the future. In Louisville, there’s always time for another round.

Visit the link seen below for some great interviews …

http://www.southernfoodways.com/oral_history/louisville_barroom_culture/index.shtml

Photos from SFA’s Boudin and Gumbo Trail

28 Aug

This is a link of good old spicy Louisiana Boudin — good eating!

The Southern Foodways Alliance has been on the road tracking down the finest boudin and gumbo that the great state of Louisiana has to offer. This field study has resulted in some wonderful photographs which are right down our alley. Take a long look at http://www.flickr.com/photos/southernfoodwaysalliance/