Tag Archives: Po Boys

Bozo’s Seafood Market & Deli in Pascagoula, MS Doesn’t Clown Around

9 Mar

Bozo front

Bozo’s Seafood Market and Deli has been around since 1956 — that’s longer than I have been around. But as my Granny Justice often said, “Old school is GOOD school.”  That is most definitely the case at Bozo’s — they don’t clown here. Every coastal community should have such a go-to seafood dive. Sadly, few compare to the almighty Bozo!

bozo counter

When you’re ready to order, step right up to the little card table near the back of the dining room. A gentleman seated there will take your order and jot it down (along with your first name) on a basic white paper lunch bag. The sack is then flipped back to a red headed woman toiling away in the kitchen. The line to order was pretty short when we arrived mid-afternoon. But we’re told that lines at lunchtime can sometimes stretch all the way back to the front entry. After more than a half century of business, Bozo’s is anything but a secret in these parts.

bozo muff

Okay, folks — now THAT’S a Muffaletta!!!

bozo cracklin

Pork Cracklins are a popular side item at Bozo’s

bozo zapps

Zapp’s Chips are terrific — and Bozo’s has you covered

Bozo OB

bozo zat

bozo shrimp salad

Take a gander at this mouth-watering Shrimp Salad – amazing!

bozo po boy

Eileen and I split a Fried Shrimp Po Boy and, as expected, it was awesome. The shrimp were plump, fresh and right out of the fryer. We ordered ours “fully dressed” and added just a splash of Tabasco before rolling up our sleeves and digging in. This decent sized, overstuffed sandwich was just $6.99. That’s a very fair price when you consider the price of fresh seafood these days. If you’re really hungry, I’d like to suggest the Shrimp Overload — a footlong po-boy stuffed with 1 1/2 pounds of fried shrimp for just $13.99. Now that’s a MEAL! If you’re more of an oyster person, try the Oyster Box with a dozen fried bi-valves, French fries, onion rings, and hush puppies for only $8.99.  

bozo table

This custom table is perfect for shelling shrimp or crawfish

bozo painting

A painting of a local fisherman (above) tells the story at Bozo’s — it’s fresh off the boat here. And it is a working man’s joint. The portions are generous and the prices more than fair. What more could you ask for? Well, besides Bozo’s opening a location in your neighborhood. They really don’t clown around here, but you will leave with a big, messy smile on your face.

Bozo’s Seafood Market & Deli

2012 Ingalls Avenue, Pascagoula, MS 39567

(228) 762-3322; Mon-Sat 8-8; Sunday 8-6

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GooRoo’s Grill in Robertsdale, AL

21 Aug

GooRoo’s Grill can be found along Route 104 (just west of Highway 59; across from the Livestock Auction) in Robertsdale, Alabama. It’s been there for a while, but we had not tried them out until yesterday. Glad we stopped in. Nice folks and definitely a notch or two above big brand fast food. Things must be going well for Ed (The GooRoo). Internet reviews have been positive and they will soon be moving into a larger, more permanent location just down the road a piece.

GooRoo’s bright orange globe logo lists many of their popular food offerings.

The burgers at GooRoo’s are indeed extremely popular – and reasonable too.

We ordered up a GooRoo Burger on our first visit. Must try the seafood soon.

The GooRoo Burger comes on a nice fluffy bun and is topped with real Cheddar Cheese. It’s gooey and good — just what you would expect from a guy nicknamed The GooRoo. We sampled the 1/4 lb. burger. It’s also offered in a hulking 1/2 pound size for those with big  boy appetites. All food here is cooked to order with the seafood and ground beef coming fresh from nearby markets.

Just look at that cheese! Now how can you resist that, people???

GooRoo’s also offers seafood po-boys & what’s said to be a pretty good gumbo.  

www.gooroosgrill.com

Po-Boys & Muffulettas – A Brief History

7 Aug

po

In preparation for our New Orleans dining adventure, I was doing a little research on some of the city’s culinary traditions. I found these interesting tidbits on the web site for the world famous Leidenheimer Bakery, makes of the finest breads for po-boys and muffulettas.

During the early years of the 20th century, two brothers, Benny and Clovis Martin, migrated to New Orleans from rural Raceland, Louisiana. When the Martins first reached the city, they found employment as streetcar conductors. Later, they opened a sandwich shop near the French Market and made a culinary discovery: if they concocted sandwiches out of the traditional loaf of French bread, with its tapered ends, the resulting sandwiches would vary in size. The solution was relatively simple: the modern, more or less symmetrical po-boy loaf, which could be cut into equal size sandwiches.

As for the name, during the late 1920’s, the New Orleans streetcar conductors went on strike. The Martins vowed to feed their striking brethren for free. When one of the strikers entered their shop, the call went out: “Here comes anther po-boy!”

The ingredients that go on a po-boy are virtually limitless, depending on one’s imagination: hot roast beef with gravy, ham and cheese (known in New Orleans as a “combination”), fried seafood (oysters, shrimp, softshell crabs, catfish), hot sausage, meatballs–even French fries. When the New Orleans po-boy is “dressed,” the reference has nothing to do with fashion: “dressed” in New Orleans nomenclature means that lettuce, tomatoes, and mayonnaise are added. Po-boys are the great equalizers of New Orleans culture, consumed by workingmen, bankers, doctors, lawyers, musicians, Mardi Gras Indian chiefs, and Carnival Kings. What the finest po-boys have in common is bread baked by Leidenheimer, “Good to the last Crumb” since 1896.

muff

The muffuletta is an Italian-style sandwich invented by Salvatore Lupo in 1906 at Central Grocery in New Orleans’ French Quarter. The origins of the name are vague. Some sources say that it was named after one of Lupo’s best customers: others believe that the name refers to the distinctive round sesame seed-coated bread. What’s unanimous is that the muffuletta is one of the tastiest of all New Orleans culinary creations.

The traditional New Orleans muffuletta is stuffed with ham, salami, various cheeses and marinated olive salad. Muffuletta variations include seafood, turkey, and even a vegetarian version, with grilled eggplant substituted for the meat. The key ingredient is the bread, which has to remain crusty despite the onslaught of melted cheese and olive oil. For this reason, master muffuletta makers demand bread baked by Leidenheimer. www.leidenheimer.com

Explore these Two Worthwhile Southern Books

9 Oct

The restaurant’s second cookbook is an invitation into a family experience. Anthony and Gail’s son, John, shares his parents’ lives through recipes, anecdotes, photos, and letters of support they received after Hurricane Katrina.

In business for more than eighty years, Uglesich’s began as a po-boy shop in 1924. The lunch counter was handed down to a second generation, Anthony Uglesich, son of the Yugoslavian founder. Anthony added a new chef, his wife Gail, and new recipes, excluding the luxuries of coffee and dessert. Their devoted patrons enjoyed a menu consisting mostly of seafood dishes.

Beginning with an egg sandwich for five cents, the restaurant has since taken on a life of its own. It closed on weekends and for summer vacation while the owners experimented at home or took a break. It didn’t accept reservations or credit cards. Far from being the typical sleepy, small-time mom-and-pop, the restaurant and everyone in it moved nonstop from open to close, and it gained a national reputation.

The restaurant belonged to the family that shares its name, but it also belonged to the customers, consisting mostly of regulars and some frequent tourists who formed lines around the block to get in. Other guests have included Emeril Lagasse and Martha Stewart, who both featured the restaurant on their respective television programs. Newcomers may have been put off by the small size (only ten tables), or the exterior, desperately in need of new paint, but that didn’t stop the limos from pulling up outside.

http://www.pelicanpub.com/Press_Release.asp?passval=9781589805514&title=COOKING%20WITH%20THE%20UGLESICHES

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HISTORIC CHURCHES OF MISSISSIPPI

Historic Churches of Mississippi is Sherry Pace’s photographic tribute to religious architecture in Mississippi. In her new book she showcases 133 of the state’s most notable historic churches and synagogues dating from the 1820s through the 1920s. Close-ups of some of the structures reveal the work of talented artisans and beautiful architectural detailing.

Architectural historian Richard J. Cawthon provides historic and architectural background both in the introductory essay and in the captions to Pace’s photographs. The religious styles and forms represented range from simple wood-frame country churches to elaborate cathedrals, including the Federal, Gothic Revival, Greek Revival, Italianate, Romanesque, Moorish, and Neoclassical Revival styles.

All of the churches are documented by the Historic Preservation Division of the Department of Archives and History. The book includes images of several churches that have since been destroyed or damaged by Hurricane Katrina. On the front cover of the catalog is the bell tower of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer in Biloxi. Made a memorial after surviving Hurricane Camille in 1969, it was destroyed during Katrina.

With churches from Aberdeen, Bay St. Louis, Biloxi, Bogue Chitto, Brookhaven, Byhalia, Canton, Carrollton, Centreville, Church Hill, Clarksdale, Clinton, Columbus, Como, Enterprise, Greenville, Greenwood, Grenada, Gulfport, Hattiesburg, Hazlehurst, Holly Springs, Iuka, Jackson, Laurel, Leakesville, Learned, Leland, Lexington, Liberty, Macon, Madison, Magnolia, McComb, Meridian, Natchez, New Albany, Ocean Springs, Okolona, Oxford, Pocahontas, Pontotoc, Port Gibson, Raymond, Rodney, Sardis, Shubuta, Starkville, Terry, Vaiden, Vicksburg, Water Valley, Wesson, Winona, Woodville, and Yazoo City

Sherry Pace of Madison County, Mississippi, is a freelance outdoor photographer. Her work has appeared in the Best of Photography Annual 2001 and Victorian Houses of Mississippi. Learn more about her work at http://www.sherrypacephotography.com. Richard J. Cawthon is the former chief architectural historian at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. He lives in Jackson, Mississippi.

http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/875