Tag Archives: Hank Williams

Hank Williams’ Montgomery, Alabama

17 Apr

Hank Williams may have made his name is Nashville, but he was a son of Montgomery, AL. Hard living, alcohol and pain pills killed Ole Hank at the tender age of just 29 years old. Yes, 29 years old! Just think of the music he might have produced had he lived a longer life. Needless to say, his catalog of classic country songs is still incredibly impressive.  

“I Saw the Light” was Hank’s biggest gospel hit

Hank’s final resting place at Oakwood Cemetary in Montgomery, AL

Alan Jackson’s B/W video was moving tribute to memory of Hank Williams

Hank is buried alongside his wife, Audrey

Williams recorded a few songs under the moniker of “Luke the Drifter”

Me paying respects to the King of Country

Statue in downtown Montgomery park

A more detailed look at Hank and his guitar

Entering Hank’s museum in downtown Montgomery

Standup of Williams at museum entrance

This marker directs fans to Hank’s gravesite

SFA Summer Field Trip Motors to Bristol

20 Apr

mountain

Please read this message from our friends at SFA —

Join us as we explore the foodways of the northeastern reaches of Tennessee and the southwestern reaches of Virginia. Bristol, which straddles the two states and is known as the birthplace of country music, will be our headquarters.

We begin on THURSDAY EVENING with an Infield Supper at Bristol Motor Speedway. We’ve got all-access passes to the pits and permission to run cars on the high bank oval. We’ll enjoy hickoried sandwiches from Larry Proffitt’s fabled Ridgewood Barbecue, and brown whiskey.
 
FRIDAY means morning expeditions. Among the choices are trout cleaning and cookery, a winery tour, a pickle beancooking class by Sheri Castle, and a barbecue pit tutorial by Larry Proffitt. But first a Fred Sauceman lecture on local food and music. And a breakfast of stack cakes, from Jill Sauceman’s family recipe. Lunch is at the Burger Bar, where Hank Williams ate his last meal. We’ll hear a talk by Ted Olson on the Bristol Sessions. Come evening we tour a photography exhibit by Larry Smith and attend a re-staging of the “Farm and Fun Radio Hour.” At the Bristol Train Station, we’ll enjoy a trout supper, prepared by Sean Brock, a native of nearby Wise, Virginia, now cooking at McCrady’s in Charleston, South Carolina.
 
SATURDAY starts with a butterscotch pie breakfast from Blackbird Bakery. And a trip to the Abingdon, Virginia, Farmers Market with Anthony Flaccavento of Appalachian Sustainable Development. Following is a history tour of the Barter Theater. And our annual Anson Mills lunch, cooked by Karen Urie and John Shields of Town House in nearby Chilhowie, Virginia, served at Anthony Flaccavento’s farm. That night we travel to the Carter Fold, the cradle of American folk music. We’ll eat soup beans and chicken salad, prepared by the descendants of Mother Maybelle Carter. And homemade chocolate cake. We’ll dance to the Larkin Family band. Back at home, we’ll toast the weekend with a down home digestif of herbal Dr. Enuf and moonshine.
Cost for the weekend is $285 for members, $315 for nonmembers, inclusive of all lectures and meals.

“Air Castle of the South” – WSM

12 Oct

I just received a review copy of this book and finished it in two days. I would highly recommend it for anyone who is interested in the history of country music or in the development of radio as a medium. Havighurst tells this Southern success story with great detail and does a fine job of weaving in interesting sidebars on personalities like Dinah Shore, Minnie Pearl, Sam Phillips, Roy Acuff and many others. I especially enjoyed the behind the scenes anecdotes regarding the early days of the Grand Ole Opry, which really helped to put WSM on the national map. Buy this book — you’ll enjoy it.

Started by the National Life and Accident Insurance Company in 1925, WSM became one of the most influential and exceptional radio stations in the history of broadcasting and country music. WSM gave Nashville the moniker “Music City USA” as well as a rich tradition of music, news, and broad-based entertainment. With the rise of country music broadcasting and recording between the 1920s and ‘50s, WSM, Nashville, and country music became inseparable, stemming from WSM’s launch of the Grand Ole Opry, popular daily shows like Noontime Neighbors, and early morning artist-driven shows such as Hank Williams on Mother’s Best Flour.

 

Sparked by public outcry following a proposal to pull country music and the Opry from WSM-AM in 2002, Craig Havighurst scoured new and existing sources to document the station’s profound effect on the character and self-image of Nashville. Introducing the reader to colorful artists and businessmen from the station’s history, including Owen Bradley, Minnie Pearl, Jim Denny, Edwin Craig, and Dinah Shore, the volume invites the reader to reflect on the status of Nashville, radio, and country music in American culture.

 

http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/43dyt6hb9780252032578.html

 

And for all you Minnie Pearl fans, here’s a clip with Carl Smith …