Tag Archives: Collectors’ Choice

COLLECTORS’ CHOICE UNVEILS LIVE LABEL

26 Mar

COLLECTORS’ CHOICE MUSIC LIVE LABEL TO MINE THE BEST RARE AND UNISSUED LIVE PERFORMANCES

CD series launches with Johnny Winter, Hot Tuna, and Poco

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — Collectors’ Choice Music, the label that’s come to be known for compelling and often unexpected CD reissues, has announced the launch of Collectors’ Choice Music Live, a new label devoted to releasing great live performances, most of which have never previously been commercially available.

The series will launch April 20 with the release of four CDs: Johnny Winter And’s Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70; Poco’s Live at Columbia Studios, Hollywood 9/30/71; and Hot Tuna’s Live at the New Orleans House, Berkeley, CA September 1969.

According to Collectors’ Choice Music GM Gordon Anderson, “After some 15 years of reissuing albums and compiling artists, we’re convinced that some of the biggest remaining veins of gold in the vaults are the live shows that a lot of labels recorded of their artists in their prime, particularly those who made their reputation with improvisational prowess and/or ever-changing set lists. These first releases on our new Collectors’ Choice Music Live label certainly fit that description.”

Johnny Winter And — Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70: To commemorate the release of his Johnny Winter And album, Texas blues guitarist/singer Johnny Winter played some shows at New York’s Fillmore East, some of which were compiled on 1971’s Live Johnny Winter And, a classic live album of the era to which this release makes a nice bookend. He had just formed a new band consisting of former member of the McCoys (“Hang on Sloopy”) including Rick Derringer on guitar, bassist Randy Jo Hobbs, and drummer Randy Zehringer. Although the McCoys were none too familiar with Winter’s work, they proved quick studies and entered the studio to make the album Johnny Winter And within three weeks. The New York Times reviewed the Fillmore show, citing “a considerable improvement over Winter’s previous band. Winter and [Derringer] played solos back at each other, simultaneously and in alternation.” The live album contains the Winter hit “Rock and Roll Hoochie Coo” and his take on Bob Dylan’s “Highway 61” alongside blues classics “Rollin’ and Tumblin’,” “It’s My Own Fault” and “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl.”

PocoLive at Columbia Studios, Hollywood, 9/30/71: In the fall of ’71, Poco was arguably the most popular of the first generation country-rock bands. By then, their album Deliverin’ had cracked the Top 30 and Poco thanked its label, Epic Records, with a private showcase at the CBS Records’ Hollywood studio. “We just set up as we would have for a small club,” recalls frontman Richie Furay, whose bandmates included guitarist/singer Paul Cotton (from the Illinois Speed Press), bassist Tim Schmidt (later of the Eagles), pedal steel player Rusty Young and drummer/vocalist George Grantham. By this time, Poco was evolving from country-rock towards an edgier rock sound. Says Furay, “Though we were innovators of the L.A. ‘country-rock’ sound, we weren’t going top be pigeonholed into being a one-sound band.” The 14 songs they performed for label employees that day were a solid cross-section of tunes that had appeared on its first four albums including the medley “Hard Luck Child/Child’s Claim to Fame/Pickin’ Up the Pieces,” plus “I Guess You Made It,” “A Man Like Me,” “Ol’ Forgiver,” “Heart That Music,” “Hurry Up,” “You Are the One” and more — an hour of music in all.

Hot Tuna: Live at the New Orleans House, Berkeley, CA September 1969: Hot Tuna was, of course, the blues band-within-a-band side project of Jefferson Airplane’s Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady that outlasted the parent band and continues to this day. Interestingly, the duo’s first commercial album, which made it to #30 on the Billboard pop album chart, was recorded live at Berkeley’s New Orleans House, but a lot more material was taped than was released. Much of it is issued for the first time on this 68-minute CD, which consists entirely of previously unreleased recordings. Explaining why they recorded their debut album was recorded live, Kaukoken says, “We tend to go places . . . and you lose a bit of that when you work in the studio. And it was cheaper too!” Of the 13 songs on this CD, six — “Death Don’t Have No Mercy,” “Winin’ Boy Blues,” “Uncle Sam Blues,” “I Know You Rider,” “Don’t You Leave Me Here” and “How Long Blues” — were included on the first Hot Tuna album, though the versions here are selected from different performances than the ones used on that LP. Other songs include Blind Boy Fuller’s “Keep On Truckin’,” Rev. Gary Davis’ “Keep Our Lamps Trimmed and Burning” and “Candy Man,” and Blind Blake’s “That’ll Never Happen No More.”


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New Collection Spotlights Paul Revere & The Raiders

13 Feb

Often forgotten by critics discussing mid-60’s American rock, Paul Revere and The Raiders had an impressive string of ten or so hits that few groups of the era could match. Positioned somewhere between the zany showmanship of The Monkees and the grit of the early Beatles, lead singer Mark Lindsey and the band started out as a popular garage band in the Pacific Northwest. The boys could write a little bit and play their own instruments, something it took the Monkees several years to develop.

Like The Monkees,  The Raiders were aided by consistent TV exposure, skillful production (by Doris Day’s son, Terry Melcher), and the support of some superior song writers and West Coast session players (master drummer Hal Blaine, to name just one). Mark Lindsey was also one of the best leather-throated shouters of the period. This thorough collection includes all the hits, misses, and oddities. It’s a must have for longtime fans and curiosity seekers alike. Pay special attention and reverance to rockers like “Ups and Downs,” “Kicks,” “Good Thing,” “Hungry,” “Just Like Me,” and “Steppin’ Out.”     

Here’s the product description from Collector’s Choice …

Having done complete singles collections on such great 60s singles bands as Jan & Dean, Gary Lewis & the Playboys and Jay & the Americans to rapturous applause from the collector community, we knew which group they were hungry for next it had to be Paul Revere & the Raiders! And, with all due respect to those previous collections, we think this one might the best set yet!

Once again, Ed Osborne is your annotator and curator for this triple-disc collection, which features all 62 commercially-released A and B sides the band recorded for Columbia in its various incarnations (as Paul Revere & the Raiders, Paul Revere & the Raiders Featuring Mark Lindsay, the Raiders, etc.), plus their two Special Products tracks Corvair Baby and SS396 and two bonus tracks, commercial jingles for Mattell s Swingy Doll and the Pontiac Judge GTO Breakaway Commercial for GM.

As with our previous collections, all singles appear in their original mono taken from original tapes (on the first two discs) and original stereo from original tapes (on the last disc), with invaluable assistance provided by Columbia vault-meister and engineer extaordinaire Bob Irwin. Copious liner notes featuring new, exclusive interviews with Raiders Paul Revere, Mark Lindsay, Phil Fang Volk, Keith Allison, Jim Harpo Valley and manager Roger Hart accompany, festooned with rare photos. It’s the definitive collection from one of the great early American rock n’ roll bands, and remember – many of these original single versions have never appeared on CD! 66 tracks!

Get your copy now at http://www.ccmusic.com/item.cfm?itemid=CCM20882

George Jones Classic LPs Re-Released on CD

1 Apr

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Two classic Billy Sherrill-produced albums from the early ‘70s to be housed on a single CD, due out April 7.

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — The original liner notes from 1972 say it all: “George Jones has been around long enough to be a household name to country music fans. Even though his unique phrasing and style, his trademarks, are still the same as his ‘The Race Is On’ and ‘White Lightnin’’ days, there’s a subtle difference — a mellowing that comes from years of experience combined with the teaming of super-talented George and equally talented producer Billy Sherrill.” On April 7, 2009, two of Jones’ signature Sherrill-produced albums, A Picture of Me and Nothing Ever Hurts Me, will be reissued as a single CD by American Beat Records, now part of the Collectors’ Choice Music family of labels.

Both A Picture of Me and Nothing Ever Hurts Me are regarded as George Jones classics, and both are recipient of rare five-star reviews on AllMusic.com. A Picture of Me reached No. 3 on Billboard’s Country Album chart and featured two Top 10 smashes — the title track and “What My Woman Can’t Do.” A world-class songwriter in his own right, Jones nonetheless employed several of Nashville’s finest to write many of the songs on these albums — then-wife Tammy Wynette (“Wine [You’ve Used Me Long Enough]”), Tom T. Hall (“Second Handed Flowers, ” “Never Having You”), Lefty Frizzell (“Mom and Dad’s Waltz”), Bobby Braddock (“Nothing Ever Hurt Me [Half As Bad as Losing You]”), Freddy Weller and Spooner Oldham (“She Loves Me [Right Out of Mind]”) and Peanut Montgomery (“The Man Worth Lovin’ You, ” “We Found a Match”). In addition, The Jordanaires, best known as vocal accompanists on many of Elvis Presley’s hits, provide background vocals here.

In the space of two short years, American Beat Records has made a name for itself as a reissue label concentrating on ‘70s, ‘80s and ‘90s power pop and country. Collectors’ Choice Music is proud to announce that American Beat has joined its list of imprints (along with Noble Rot and Hep Cat Records), and that the label will continue to put out key Americana releases, including upcoming deluxe reissues from the Del-Lords and the Paley Brothers!

Blue Ash Still Smokin’

7 Nov

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We received a review copy of this CD yesterday from our friends at Conqueroo. I has never heard of the band before, which is surprising because I’m a pretty big fan of the Power Pop movement. Blue Ash is kind of a cross between Badfinger and Buffalo Springfield, complete with plenty of 1970’s arena rock bombast. Dig the groovy threads and the white patent leather zip up boots. They even perform a crunchy version of the Beatles’ “Any Time at All.” Seek it out if you can. This is not a bad addition to your Power Pop catalog alongside other better-known practicioners of the underappreciated genre. If nothing else it’s an interesting timepiece worthy of a fresh listen.

When England’s esteemed ‘Guardian’ newspaper assembled their list of 1000 Albums to Hear Before You Die, the 1973 debut album from Blue Ash made the grade amongst all the established classics—pretty remarkable for an obscure record that was out-of-print for over 30 years! Well, we at ‘Collectors’ Choice’ have rectified that injustice, so this critically acclaimed LP can take its rightful place in the power pop pantheon. Signed to Mercury by legendary rock critic/publicist Paul Nelson, this four-piece from Youngstown, OH was among the first power pop bands alongside Badfinger, Big Star and Raspberries to revive the virtues of mid-‘Sixties rock against the then prevailing tides of prog excess and singer-songwriter self-absorption. ‘No More, No Less’ showcases the band’s knack for melodic three-minute pop tunes delivered via a breathless attack that melded the Byrds’ jangle with the Who’s rhythm section and the Fab Four’s harmonies, as heard on the first cut and best-known track ‘Abracadabra (Have You Seen Her?)’. Also includes their rave-up of the Dylan rarity ‘Dusty Old Fairgrounds’ and such proto-power pop gems as ‘I Remember a Time’ and ‘All I Want’.This first-ever CD release features brand-new liner notes, courtesy of the band’s bassist and co-songwriter Frank Secich, along with rare photos from the band’s archives. A ‘Collectors’ Choice Music’ exclusive!