Tag Archives: Barbecue

Great New BBQ Book from UNC Press

8 Feb

holy

North Carolina is home to the longest continuous barbecue tradition on the North American mainland. Authoritative, spirited, and opinionated (in the best way), Holy Smoke is a passionate exploration of the lore, recipes, traditions, and people who have helped shape North Carolina’s signature slow-food dish.

Three barbecue devotees, John Shelton Reed, Dale Volberg Reed, and William McKinney, trace the origins of North Carolina ‘cue and the emergence of the heated rivalry between Eastern and Piedmont styles. They provide detailed instructions for cooking barbecue at home, along with recipes for the traditional array of side dishes that should accompany it. The final section of the book presents some of the people who cook barbecue for a living, recording firsthand what experts say about the past and future of North Carolina barbecue. 

Filled with historic and contemporary photographs showing centuries of North Carolina’s “barbeculture,” as the authors call it, Holy Smoke is one of a kind, offering a comprehensive exploration of the Tar Heel barbecue tradition.

John Shelton Reed and Dale Volberg Reed live in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Both are members of the Southern Foodways Alliance and the North Carolina Barbecue Society. They have collaborated on other books, including 1001 Things Everyone Should Know about the South and Cornbread Nation 4: The Best of Southern Food Writing. William McKinney founded the Carolina BBQ Society while a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He now lives in Virginia.

Reviews

“[A] funny, fantastically southern memoir of the infamous East-West brawl over North Carolina barbecue. . . . Everything we ever wanted to know about the history of the ‘cue, the sauce, and the people behind this Tar Heel tradition.”
–Southern Living

“A cultural and culinary history of barbecue . . . the book includes directions on shaping cornmeal into perfect hush puppies, a who’s who of the region’s pit masters, and mouthwatering photographs of sizzling pigs.”
–The Chronicle of Higher Education

“The book leaves no glowing coal unturned in its examination of our state’s barbecue history, cooking techniques, recipes, and characters who have honed the fine art of turning hogs into something heavenly.”
–Our State

“Jam-packed with entertaining and authoritative history, culture, personality sketches, and thoughtful opinion.”
–D.G. Martin, syndicated columnist

“A treasure trove, a testament (in the Holy Roller sense), an exuberant celebration of the one thing s.0erved in the South that is better than fried chicken.”
–Nicki Leone, BiblioBuffet.com

“Part cultural history, part cookbook, Holy Smoke . . . may be the best tome ever written about pulled pork.”
—Atlanta Journal-Constitution

http://uncpress.unc.edu/HolySmoke/index.html

“Savage Barbecue” Makes for Interesting Reading

26 Aug

Savage Barbecue
“Race, Culture, and the Invention of America’s First Food”
by Andrew Warnes

America’s first food as an invented tradition Barbecue is a word that means different things to different people. It can be a verb or a noun. It can be pulled pork or beef ribs. And, especially in the American South, it can cause intense debate and stir regional pride. Perhaps then, it is no surprise that the roots of this food tradition are often misunderstood.

In Savage Barbecue, Andrew Warnes traces what he calls America’s first food through early transatlantic literature and culture. Building on the work of scholar Eric Hobsbawm, Warnes argues that barbecue is an invented tradition, much like Thanksgiving-one long associated with frontier mythologies of ruggedness and relaxation.

Starting with Columbus’s journals in 1492, Warnes shows how the perception of barbecue evolved from Spanish colonists’ first fateful encounter with natives roasting iguanas and fish over fires on the beaches of Cuba. European colonists linked the new food to a savagery they perceived in American Indians, ensnaring barbecue in a growing web of racist attitudes about the New World. Warnes also unearths the etymological origins of the word barbecue, including the early form barbacoa; its coincidental similarity to barbaric reinforced emerging stereotypes.

Barbecue, as it arose in early transatlantic culture, had less to do with actual native practices than with a European desire to define those practices as barbaric. Warnes argues that the word barbecue retains an element of violence that can be seen in our culture to this day. Savage Barbecue offers an original and highly rigorous perspective on one of America’s most popular food traditions.

Purchase your copy today at: http://ugapress.org/0820328960.html