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Nashville’s Triple Threat Jerry Reed Enjoys New Life Thanks to Real Gone Music

26 May

JERRY REED

The Unbelievable Guitar & Voice of Jerry Reed

Nashville Underground

OK, folks. Let me begin by stating that this CD does not contain the radio hits “Amos Moses,’ “When You’re Hot You’re Hot,” “Ko-Ko Joe,” or “East Bound and Down.” So does this mean should immediately dismiss the new Jerry Reed release from Real Gone Music? Nope. Check that. Make it “Hell no!” Jerry Reed Hubbard was one talented cat, y’all. Master guitar picker. Cracker Jack sense of humor. Accomplished song writer. Starred in a few movies too (who can forget him as Burt Reynold’s sidekick in “Smokey and the Bandit”?).

Real Gone’s new CD covers 2 early Reed efforts (1967 & 1968) on the RCA label. RCA was riding high during those times – thanks in good measure to the production skills of legendary Chet Atkins and all the talented musicians and tunesmiths who called Nashville’s fabled RCA Studio B home. Reed spent some valuable time in that stable, but it soon became evident that this Georgia native had major star power.

Check out “Guitar Man” — you’ll dig it. Elvis did too. The King recorded it and it became a sizeable hit. Presley also tackled “U.S. Male,” another rockin’ track appearing on the original issue of “The Unbelievable Guitar and Voice of Jerry Reed.” Sure, a pretty wordy album title. But you must keep in mind that Jerry Reed was not exactly a man of few words. In fact, some of his recordings might even be called “Redneck Rap.” The old boy had a way with the King’s English, that’s for certain.

Reed’s nimble fingers get a 1:59 workout on his signature instrumental piece, “The Claw.” “Love Man” spotlight’s his undeniable Dixie-fried bravado, while a few Nashville Underground tracks like “A Thing Called Love” showcase Jerry’s softer side and actually tug at the heartstrings. Reed’s voice tended to take on a deeper tone when delivering this type of sentimental material. The song’s a keeper … as are cuts like “Fine on my Mind” and the raucous “Tupelo Mississippi Flash.” The latter tune is a fine example of Jerry Reed’s trademark sense of humor and gift of gab. Have a listen to this disc, hoss. We think it will, as Jerry used to say, “knock your hat in the creek.”

Two classic, late-‘60s albums from Jerry Reed, both of them never on CD before! The titles to these two records (his first two) really tell the tale; Jerry was an unbelievable guitarist and singer, and you can add songwriter to the list—at least Elvis thought so, as he covered both “Guitar Man” and “U.S. Male” from Unbelievable (and hired Jerry to play guitar on both)! Jerry returned the favor by writing an Elvis tribute song (“Tupelo Mississippi Flash”) on 1968’s Nashville Underground, which lives up to its title by presenting a revelatory blend of country, rock ‘n’ roll, folk, blue-eyed soul and even progressive pop.

Though Reed was a protégé of Chet Atkins, his eclectic taste and irrepressible personality—later on full display in the Smokey and the Bandit films—ensured that this record busted out of the countrypolitan mold that held sway in Nashville at the time. Both of these albums are must-listens for any alt-country and roots music fan, and Chris Morris contributes notes that place these two albums in context of Jerry’s incredible (and, to this day, underappreciated) career.

Featured Songs:

It Don’t Work That Way

Guitar Man

You’re Young and You’ll Forget

Woman Shy

I Feel for You

Take a Walk

Love Man

If I Promise

U.S. Male

Long Gone

If It Comes to That

The Claw

Remembering

A Thing Called Love

You Wouldn’t Know a Good Thing

Save Your Dreams

Almost Crazy

You’ve Been Cryin’ Again

Fine on My Mind

Tupelo Mississippi Flash

Wabash Cannonball

Hallelujah, I Love Her So

John Henry

Available May 29, 2012 Pre-Order Now!

Austin’s Stone River Boys are Making Some Noise

24 Apr

Fans of the Fabulous Thunderbirds, Paul Thorn, Junior Brown, and Chuck Prophet will dig this tasty Texas stew of blues, honky tonk, and country funk. Take a few minutes to view the videos provided here and you’ll get the general idea. It is a s#%t kicking, boot scooting party y’all — and you’re invited!

When Dave Gonzalez put together a band to support the release of the Hacienda Brothers’ final recording, it was a tough job. Dave’s musical partner and co-founder Chris Gaffney had recently passed and Dave wanted to get out there one last time to pay tribute to his close friend. When Dave turned to Mike Barfield to fill out a band made up of Austin s finest pickers, the Stone River Boys’ seed had been sown.

Love On The Dial , the debut release from the Stone River Boys, firmly establishes this band as is powerhouse in the roots music world. Dave and Mike are ably assisted by a cadre of talented musicians including Dave Biller, Scott Esbeck (Los Straitjackets), Hank Maninger (Hacienda Brothers) , Kevin Smith (Dwight Yoakam, High Noon), Fuzzy Blazek, Justin Jones and Damien Llanes.

Produced by Dave Gonzalez, it’s some of the funkiest country and countryest funk to come up the river in a good while! In addition to his work in the Hacienda Brothers, Dave Gonzalez was the driving force behind the San Diego-based Paladins for over 20 years. He s toured all over the US and Europe and is as roadworthy a player as you ll find. Mike Barfield previously led the Houston-based Hollisters and released two solo albums that earned him the title The Tyrant of Texas Funk. Love On The Dial achieves a cohesive mix of hard country and Texas funk which includes ten original compositions along with four choice covers. From the opening riff of Steve Bruton’s Bluebonnet Blue to the final notes of Boomerang, this is one hard hitting debut. And don’t miss out on the latest dance craze, it’s called the Struggle!

www.stoneriverboys.com