Archive | May, 2010

Drum Circle Rum Distillery Tour – Sarasota, FL

31 May

After doing a preliminary write-up a couple weeks back, I was finally able to visit Drum Circle Distilling in SW Florida to see exactly how they are hand-crafting Siesta Key Rum. Their sole operation is housed in a rather non-descript warehouse complex located just north of glamorous downtown Sarasota. But don’t be fooled, there is real magic happening inside these walls.  

Owners Troy Roberts (above) and Tom Clarke were hard at work when I arrived mid-morning last Wednesday. Both men grew up in the Siesta Key area. They not only run the place, they are also the only two employees of this exciting, fledgling enterprise. Troy has long been a connoisseur of fine rums and eventually decided he wanted to try making it — but only if it was world class stuff. No corners have been cut and, much like the old Orson Welles commercials, they will sell no rum before its time.   

If you’re gonna get in the rum business, you gotta be 1 part Jimmy Buffett and 1 part Enrico Fermi. No kidding. Just look at the product development workspace pictured above. I’m guessing that Troy and Tom are glad they paid attention during high school chemistry classes!

The early makings of clear Siesta Key Rum rumble away in the copper plated still seen above. It looks a bit like a giant deep sea diver’s helmet, doesn’t it?

Testing various versions in search of the perfect blend of rum.

I’m guessing this step ladder gets a lot of work.

The sparkling, metallic equipment at Drum Circle is all top notch and made by the Christian Carl Distilleries in Stuttgart, Germany (www.brewing-distilling.com). Sure, Germany is not exactly the epicenter of the world’s rum production, yet Troy explained that the Germans make some of the finest distilling machinery money can buy. Roberts mentioned that gin is perhaps the most common spirit distilled using Carl’s technology.

Competing products are frequently sampled to compare differing flavor profiles. Troy said they don’t ever want to become big like Bacardi, but they want to be consistently better than Bacardi and the other giants in the global marketplace. Based on our initial tasting, they are off to a fine start.

It’s all small batch at Drum Circle Distilling. The little oak barrels shown above are used for the aging of a soon-to-come Siesta Key Gold Rum. These barrels are quite expensive (about $250 each), which will likely mean a slightly higher price point when this product is at last ready for market. The clear rum currently sells for about $21 per bottle (a bargain), while the gold will probably fall in the reasonable $25-$28 per bottle price range. Siesta Key Rum is now offered by some 50 different liquor stores and restaurants in the greater Sarasota/Bradenton area. Slow, steady growth will insure that product quality remains high.   

Not a bad way to make a living, huh? Troy joked that they do most of their drinking before 5 o’clock around here, yet he hasn’t drawn a real pay check in about 3 years now. This is indeed a labor of love.

Is this a rum distillery or NASA?

Troy looks ready to climb aboard his “rocket ship.”

Tom shows how the small run bottling & labeling process is done.

A roll (above) of Drum Circle’s signature sand dollar labels, which are affixed at the top (over the cork) of each bottle of Siesta Key Rum. The corks (imported from Mexico) also have a very distinctive look to them.

This (above) is the “employee break room” at Drum Circle Distilling.  These guys are really livin’ the dream! We are tremendously impressed with the progress they have made and won’t be betting against them as they set out to first conquer Florida, and then the rest of the Southeast USA.

Troy and Tom were terrific hosts during my visit and graciously presented me with a bottle of rum, a Drum Circle Distilling T-shirt, and an oval  SK Rum bumper sticker as I headed back outside into the bright Florida sunshine. It wasn’t even lunch time and I was already thinking about which rum drink I was going to concoct when I arrived home at our beachside condo. It seems these guys were already rubbing off on me. RRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!  

For a couple cocktail recipes, visit the Drum Circle web site at …

http://www.drumcircledistilling.com/recipes.html 

And for more info on Siesta Key’s Drum Circle tradition, please go to …

http://www.simplysiestakey.com/DrumCircle.html

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Zac Brown Band – Chicken Fried

20 May

How could any blog called Dixie Dining not dig this???

Siesta Key Rum Gets Solid Early Reviews

19 May

As former resident of Siesta Key, seeing the little island mentioned in the media always brings a smile to my face and a sparkle to my eyes. Especially if it has anything to do with tropical libations and the key’s vibrant beach life. Can’t wait to give this rum a shot (pun intended) when we next visit SW Florida.

Here’s a recent piece that ran in the St. Petersburg Times …

SARASOTA — I’m standing at a table that appears to be half chemist’s bench and half impromptu bar. While holding a plastic thimble of clear liquid, I listen to the story of how molasses pressed from organically grown Florida sugarcane becomes that rare thing, a sippable white rum of character.

The man telling the tale is distiller Troy Roberts, lifelong rum aficionado and co-owner of Drum Circle Distilling, a distillery and producer of small-batch, hand-bottled rums. Siesta Key White Rum hit retailers’ shelves and bartenders’ arsenals — first on Siesta Key, of course — in March. The first batch of Siesta Key Golden Rum, Roberts says, needs a few more weeks in 10-gallon new American oak barrels before it is ready for market.

We sampled the young white rum from Batch 1 first. It was crystal clear and full flavored, aromatic on the nose and smooth but with just enough agreeable edge on the palate. It would be fine simply poured over ice, but it would make a mighty good mojito, too.

Next we barrel-sampled the aged rum, the golden, straight. The rambunctious youngster, weighing in at this stage of its life at an overmuscled 65 percent alcohol by volume, nearly lifted the top of my head off. Then Roberts cut a sample in half with water to approximate its polish when it has finished its time in the barrel, to yield a civilized 80 proof spirit. The golden rum, having borrowed some structural tannins and its color from the oak, is even smoother than the white and more complex. It compares favorably with my usual rum of choice, Mount Gay Barbados.

Everything about Drum Circle Distilling is small-scale and hands-on. Roberts and his father assembled the gleaming stainless steel mixing and fermentation tanks and the copper still and rectifying column. They scraped and painted the floors and walls of the industrial park warehouse-turned-distillery. They’re the ones who mop up after the messy business of loading the mixing tanks and transferring the sticky mix of molasses and water to the fermentation tanks, where Roberts’ own custom blend of two yeasts is introduced into the process prior to distilling. Likewise for moving the raw rum into aerating tanks and, for the golden, on into barrels. The bottles are filled, corked and labeled by hand and then the batch number is entered by hand on each label, which bears an evocative island illustration by Ringling College of Art & Design graduate Ron Borrensen.

The white rum retails for about $22 and the golden is expected to go for less than $25. For the growing list of merchants, bars and restaurants where you can buy the product of Roberts’ labor of love, check out drumcircledistilling.com.

John Bancroft is a freelance writer in Sarasota, specializing in food, wine and travel.

New CD Releases from Classic Cameo-Parkway Artists

16 May

I was once a big fan of the music of the late 1950s and early 1960’s. You know, that funky little window of time between Elvis and The Beatles. American popular music was sort of finding its way and labels like Cameo and Parkway were mainstays on the hit parade.  And listening to these new additions to the Collectors’ Choice catalog made me remember why I found this innocent, energetic era so appealing.

South Carolinian Chubby Checker was perhaps the best known artist produced by the labels. Chubby, whose name was derived from Fats Domino, was a terrific dancer, a charismatic personality, and a serviceable vocalist. His material consisted mostly of dance tunes and novelty songs, yet he managed to elevate the performances thanks to the shear energy he brought to the stage or the studio.   

Clint Eastwood, on the other hand, was best known as a rugged young cowpoke on the TV series “Rawhide.” But record companies of the day were quite proficient in turning matinee idols into recording stars. Ed “Kookie” Byrnes is perhaps the best example of this, although Ricky Nelson was the surely most successful. Clint actually had a pretty good singing voice and his early recordings were bolstered by top notch studio musicians and “can’t miss” Western material like “Tumbling Tumbleweeds” and Cole Porter’s “Don’t Fence Me In.”  And yes, I’ll admit that Clint’s first theme song “Rowdy” has even made its way onto my iPod.

Bobby Rydell was another teen idol blessed with good hair and straight teeth, but the kid actually had substantial vocal chops in the Bobby Darin/Wayne Newton style. He later stretched out on more swingin’ adult-oriented tunes like “Volare,” “Frenesi,” and “So Rare.” Rydell never quite made the transition to the world of Frank, Dino and Sammy. However, he did enjoy a long, somewhat lucrative career thanks to some very loyal female fans, supper clubs, casino lounges, and good genetics.

The Orlons were most like the classic Spector girl groups of the 1960s. There was a man in the group (Stephen Caldwell), but his role was typically to supply a humorous “froggy” voice to offset the soaring vocals of the act’s three skilled female singers. The Orlons, formed in Philadelphia in 1960, charted major hits with “South Street” and the dance craze “Wah-Watusi” and frequently benefited from supremely catchy material cranked out by the Brill Building’s finest songsmiths.  

Read on below — and explore these important re-releases from Collectors’ Choice. They are, along with the work of Phil Spector, part and parcel of the missing link between the birth of Rock and Roll and the British Invasion.   

Note: Terry Knight and The Pack did not exactly fit in neatly with the other artists  in this initial rollout. Their sound was highly derivative of the British Invasion performers (The Stones, Yardbirds, Donovan, etc.) and Knight really never found himself as a vocalist or performer. But that doesn’t mean this CD is not a worthwhile addition to your collection. Several tracks — including “A Change is on the Way,” “Sleep Talkin’,” and “Numbers” are fine examples of ’60s garage sounds. I also found their take on the Yardbirds’ “You’re a Better Man than I” to be extremely well-crafted and executed. Check it out if you dig The Shadows of Knight, The Buckinghams, and other Midwest rockers of the time.

On June 22, 2010, Collectors’ Choice Music in conjunction with ABKCO Music & Records will begin a rollout of six reissues and compilations from the legendary Cameo and Parkway Records masters. The initial six CDs, including four twofers, are Rawhide’s Clint Eastwood Sings Cowboy Favorites, Bobby Rydell Salutes The Great Ones/Rydell at the Copa, Chubby Checker’s It’s Pony Time/Let’s Twist Again, The Orlons’ The Wah-Watusi/South Street, Terry Knight And The Pack/Reflections plus the compilation Remember Me Baby: Cameo Parkway Vocal Groups Vol. 1 which features The Lydells, The Dovells, The Tymes, Lee Andrews, Billy And The Essentials and more.

For some time ABKCO had been looking for the right team with whom to delve into its vaults to create an ongoing Cameo Parkway reissue program.  ABKCO found the right mix in Collectors’ Choice Music and have entered into an exclusive arrangement, ensuring that a flow of reissues and compilations will be available over the next few years. All releases will be curated by Teri Landi, ABKCO’s resident engineer and catalog archivist, and annotated by respected music journalists.

Jody Klein, CEO of ABKCO Music & Records commented, “We are delighted to have Collectors’ Choice Music onboard for these releases of great historical relevance. Their expertise in this area will ensure that the music that made Cameo-Parkway such a cultural touchstone will be enjoyed by music fans who have long awaited these collections.”

Much of the material has not been available since its original release on vinyl some 45-50 years ago. Both companies have approached these reissues with careful A&R, annotation, package design and sound engineering. Said Gordon Anderson, Sr. VP of Collectors’ Choice, “The opportunity for our company to release this material represents the culmination of a career-long dream for me, and a fervently-held dream for thousands of our Collectors’ Choice Music customers.”

Founded by Bernie Lowe and Kal Mann in December 1956, Philadelphia-based Cameo-Parkway was one of the great American indie labels during the late ’50s and ’60s.  It was home to big pop-rock and R&B stars like Bobby Rydell, Chubby Checker and The Orlons, as well as to all manner of styles and artists both famous and obscure. It also represents the last great, largely untapped repository of vintage pop music from the rock ’n’ roll era.

It has been argued that popular culture was forever changed by the impact of Cameo-Parkway hits. Cameo-Parkway was one of America’s leading independent labels during the era that preceded the British invasion, offering a breathtaking range of pop, soul, rock, novelty and dance records that have continued to resonate with fans over the past five decades.  The label’s biggest claim to fame is the string of dance craze hits that followed in the wake of “The Twist.”  These included “Mashed Potato Time,” “The Wah-Watusi,” “Bristol Stomp,” “Do the Bird,” “Hully Gully Baby,” “Pony Time,” “The 81,” “Limbo Rock” and, of course, “Let’s Twist Again.”

Beyond the dance songs — most of which originated in Philadelphia — Cameo-Parkway issued garage rock classics from the Midwest including ? And The Mysterians’ “96 Tears” as well as early tracks by Detroit’s Bob Seger, The Rationals and Terry Knight And The Pack. The label even embraced the British invasion, releasing sides by The Kinks and Screaming Lord Sutch. Soul played a significant role with singles by The Tymes, Patti LaBelle And Her Bluebells, Frankie Beverly And The Butlers, The Five Stairsteps, and Bunny Sigler. Beyond those, Cameo was the label home of Bobby Rydell, who transformed from “swingin’ pop idol” to a mature vocalist and was accepted by both teen and adult audiences with such hits as “Wild One,” “Kissin’ Time” and more adult fare such as “Volare” and “Sway.”  

Collectors’ Choice’s initial rollout of six CDs includes the following:

• Bobby Rydell — Bobby Rydell Salutes The Great Ones/Rydell at the Copa. These two 1961 albums — presented here in their original stereo mixes — represented an effort by Rydell to move beyond the limitations of his teen idol persona. The title of Rydell’s Cameo LP, Bobby Rydell Salutes The Great Ones, works on two levels.  It is an early tribute to the performers the young singer admired all his life, as indicated by the little caricatures of Al Jolson, Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra in the upper corner of the LP’s cover, and the “great ones” in the title refers to songs from the Great American Songbook such as “Mammy,” “That Old Black Magic” and “All of You.”  By recording a live album at the Copa, Rydell was following a well-trodden trail left by other pop male vocalists like Bobby Darin and Paul Anka.  Jim Ritz contributed liner notes. 

• Chubby Checker — It’s Pony Time/Let’s Twist Again. This twofer includes two albums from the height of the Chubby Checker twist phenomenon that he and Cameo-Parkway had spawned, virtually ruling the music charts in 1960 and 1961. The first album’s title track, “Pony Time,” went to #1, his only chart-topper besides “The Twist,” while Let’s Twist Again, his fourth album, hit #11, shortly followed by three Top 10 albums in a row. Also featured here are “We Like Birdland,” “The Watusi,” The Hully Gully,” “I Could Have Danced All Night,” “Let’s Twist Again” and more.  Jim Ritz penned the liner notes.

The Orlons — The Wah-Watusi/South Street. Discovered by high school classmate and future Cameo labelmate Len Barry, The Orlons (Shirley Brickley, Marlena Davis, Rosetta Hightower and Stephen Caldwell) were one of Cameo-Parkway’s most popular vocal groups and certainly the label’s top girl group. This twofer presents their only two charting albums from 1962 and ’63 respectively, and both featuring Top 5 title tracks. Heard here in their original pristine mono with notes by Gene Sculatti that contain quotes from Caldwell (he of the ultra-low “frog” voice), this reissue contains the title hits plus “Dedicated To The One I Love,” “Tonight,” “Cement Mixer” and more.

• Terry Knight And The Pack — Terry Knight And The Pack/Reflections. Although Cameo-Parkway was best known for rock ’n’ roll, pop and R&B, these albums (originally released on Cameo’s Lucky Eleven imprint) illustrate the label’s embrace of Midwestern rock. Flint, Michigan’s Knight And The Pack were a garage band with many regional hits that never broke nationally; they might have become stars but for the fact that band members Mark Farner and Don Brewer left to form Grand Funk Railroad, with Knight producing. In his liner notes, Jeff Tamarkin tells the story of their 1966-67 fuzz-laced sounds featured in “Numbers,” “You’re a Better Man Than I,” “The Lovin’ Kind,” “One Monkey Don’t Stop No Show,” “Dimestore Debutante” and others.

Clint Eastwood — Rawhide’s Clint Eastwood Sings Cowboy Favorites: Oscar-winning actor Clint Eastwood has demonstrated a musical streak throughout his acting and directing career, and this 1963 album catches him at the beginning. Fresh from his success on the TV series Rawhide, he croons (and quite convincingly so) a collection of cowboy favorites. The set includes the 1962 single “Rowdy” b/w “Cowboy Wedding Song,” as well as “San Antonio Rose,” Bouquet of Roses,” “Along the Santa Fe Trail,” “The Last Roundup,” “Sierra, Nevada” and more.  Jim Ritz contributed liner notes.

Remember Me Baby: Cameo Parkway Vocal Groups Vol. 1: There are collectors and there are doo-wop collectors, which is why Collectors’ Choice devoted its very first compilation in the series to the vocal groups whose recordings defined Cameo-Parkway during its earliest years. Heard here are The Gainors’ “You Must Be An Angel,” Billy And The Essentials’ “Remember Me Baby,” and never before released tracks by The Dovells and The Tymes, “Short On Bread” and “Did You Ever Get My Letter?,” respectively.  Also featured are rare tracks from The Anglos, The Defenders, The Exceptions, The Expressions, The Gleems, Pookie Hudson And The Spaniels, The Impacs, The Rays, Rick And The Masters, The Sequins, The Skyliners and The Turbans — 24 tracks in all. Annotated by Ed Osborne.

http://www.ccmusic.com/

Cunningham Farms Sweet Potato Butter

15 May

I first learned about this wonderful product in one of my favorite magazines – Garden and Gun. We had to try it and, thankfully, the folks at Cunningham Farms were nice enough to send along a sample jar. I slathered some on my toast yesterday and I can tell you this jar will not last us long. The first word that comes to mind when describing this Sweet Potato Butter is “fresh.”

Hand crafted in small batches in Hancock County, Tennessee, Cunningham Farms Sweet Potato Butter is made with only the finest natural ingredients. Organic sweet potatoes, apple cider, and organic spices all play a major part in this tasteful blend. The spread is not exceptionally thick and murky, I’m guessing because it contains no artificial ingredients or preservatives. Preservatives? Hah! You may even polish off the whole jar in the first day!  

You can definitely taste the ground clove in each jar. The overall flavor profile is sort of a cross between a really fine homemade apple butter and sweet potato pie. Spread it on biscuits, bagels or English muffins in the morning. It can also be used as a glaze for pork and chicken. No matter how you plan on using it, just use it! And did I tell you it’s delicious?

Cunningham Farms provides a gourmet version of an old favorite-Sweet Potato Butter. Our product is handmade in small batches using organic sweet potatoes and locally made apple cider; yielding the highest quality gourmet Sweet Potato Butter. Hints of organic cinnamon and clove and the full flavor of the sweet potato couple with fresh apple cider to create a velvety smooth, slightly sweet spread that’s great with a wide range of foods. It’s not too sweet, just rich, warm and invocative of autumn-certainly enjoyable for every meal.

Cunningham Farms gourmet Sweet Potato Butter is perfect on toast or a croissant in the morning, on a ham sandwich, as a glaze for chicken or pork and as a topping for cake or ice cream. Also, one jar of Cunningham Farms gourmet Sweet Potato Butter is the perfect filling for a delicious sweet potato pie.

Besides providing a delicious product, Cunningham Farms is also committed to enriching our community. Our gourmet Sweet Potato Butter is handmade in the Clinch-Powell Community Kitchen, and Cunningham Farms is a member of the Appalachian Spring Cooperative in Hancock County, Tennessee. The Cooperative was created as a microenterprise incubator for entrepreneurs to make and sell value added food products. By producing our Sweet Potato Butter at the Clinch-Powell Community Kitchen we are creating jobs in one of the poorest counties in the nation. Cunningham Farms’ goal is to grow so that we can continue to help the people of our community.

Sweet Potato Butter & Cream Cheese Appetizer

Ingredients:

  • 6 Tbsp Cunningham Farms Sweet Potato Butter
  • 8 oz block of cream cheese at room temperature
  • 2 Tbsp very crisp bacon pieces
  • 2 Tbsp pecan pieces
  • 2 scallions, finely chopped

Directions:

  1. Frost cream cheese with Sweet Potato Butter
  2. Sprinkle with bacon pieces
  3. Sprinkle with pecan pieces
  4. Top with scallions
  5. Serve with crackers. May serve immediately or refridgerate.

Submitted by: Joan Bertaut – Jackson, MS

http://www.cunninghamfarms.com

“The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook”

15 May

Imagine my delight when I returned from a 4-day business trip to Kentucky and found this beautiful volume in my mailbox. The University of Kentucky Press has crafted a rather handsome piece of work. And who knew bourbon was such a versatile spirit?

The book begins, no big surprise here, with a thorough sampling of drink recipes. Highlights include The Presbyterian, The Seelbach, The Missouri Mule, and The Tropical Itch. You’ll even find a recipe for “George Washington’s Grog,” which combines bourbon, spices, butter and Madeira.

The plentiful food-oriented recipes are broken down seasonally – Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall.  Author Albert Schmid has gathered some real winners such as Chicken Kentuckiana, Rock Shrimp Jenkins (sounds like an old bluesman), Drunken Vidalias, Bourbon Steak Au Poivre, Applesauce Cake with Bourbon Frosting, and a sinful Kentucky Bourbon-Pecan Creme Brulee with Chocolate Sauce.  

The book’s colorful photography and thick, sturdy stock add to its overall sensory appeal. So let’s raise a glass of Woodford Reserve or Maker’s Mark and toast Mr. Schmid and our new friends at UK Press for a job well done. “Bourbon – it’s not just for cocktail hour anymore.”

Once considered merely the tipple of southern gentlemen or a nostalgic ingredient in a Mint Julep, bourbon has enjoyed a steady resurgence in popularity over the years with an ever-expanding and diverse audience. Distilled almost exclusively in Kentucky, bourbon has attained prominence and won recognition for its complexity, history, and tradition.

In The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook, Albert Schmid provides readers with his best collection of recipes using the famous Bluegrass spirit. From classic Kentucky cocktails such as the Mint Julep, to bourbon-inspired desserts, such as Bourbon-Pecan Crème Brûlée with Chocolate Sauce, and more savory fare, such as Steaks with Bourbon Ginger Sauce, this book supplies recipes for every course. Schmid uses the seasons of the year to guide the reader through this rich collection of bourbon dishes and color photographs. In many ways a study on the flavor profiles that pair with and improve the flavor of bourbon, this book can be used by the home cook and professional chef alike. The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook also recounts bourbon lore, food traditions, and Kentucky history.

Albert Schmid has worked as an executive chef and currently teaches at Sullivan University’s National Center for Hospitality Studies and is the author of The Hospitality Manager’s Guide to Wines, Beers, and Spirits.

http://www.kentuckypress.com

Blessing of the Fleet 2010 – Bayou La Batre, AL

14 May

“Pig – King of the Southern Table”

1 May

We were genuinely excited to receive a review copy of this beautiful new cookbook. It offers up great porcine-centered recipes for any true lover of the mighty Southern hog. James Villas, the natilly attired former Food and Wine Editor at Town and Country,  has obviously put together a winner. Yes, a rather unlikely source — you might think. Town and Country is not exactly a source we mention very often around here. Classy magazine, but not exactly our target audience.  Villas, on the other hand, has already authored The Bacon Cookbook, Biscuit Bliss and Crazy for Casseroles. Feeling any better now? And who, I ask you, can resist 300 pork recipes from a native North Carolinian? Not this guy! 

I flipped through this 424-page beauty and targeted several must-try recipes. These included Outer Banks Muddle (“a mess of fish”), Sherried Ham and Squash Casserole, Betty Jane’s Braised Pork Chops with Port Gravy, Tarpon Springs Greek Burgers, Florida Mango & Prune Stuffed Pork Loin, and a curious breakfast dish known as the Kentucky Scramble.

It all adds up to one fine collection of dishes from a high-brow dandy who has surely not forgotten, nor forsaken, his downhome Dixie roots. Pig out, y’all! 

From Publishers Weekly

If pig is indeed king, then there is trouble at the castle, for Villas (Dancing in the Lowcountry) has stormed the gates and had at him, leaving no sweetbread, shoulder, or chop untasted. So let the commoners rejoice: here are 300 recipes from Southern hog heaven that are juicy, flirtatious, and, at times, scary. Brave hearts will want to immediately dive into the Variety and Special Meats chapter for some deviled pork liver; hog’s head stew; and brains and eggs. The upper crust might prefer a pork pie. Choices include spicy Tennessee sausage; Pork, Apple and Raisin; or Bacon and Corn.
 
A section on barbecue and ribs includes both North and South Carolina styles of BBQ and half a dozen sparerib options. And where lesser authors might stray off-topic when moving to side dishes, Villas, with 13 cookbooks and two James Beard awards under his belt, knows better. All 39 vegetable and rice dishes are chock full of oink, from the mushy turnips with bacon and pork to the slab bacon hoppin’ John.
 
Similarly, there are 20 breads that are decidedly not fat-free. That other Southern king, Elvis, would surely have appreciated the bacon-peanut butter muffins, perhaps chased down with a lard hoecake or some bacon-grease hush puppies.