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Concord Re-Issues “Strangers in the Night” CD

29 Jan

Concord Music continues its streak of winning CD re-issues with this classic from “Old Blue Eyes.” This is swinging mid-sixties Frankie at his finest. The first two tracks are gold — the title cut and “The Summer Wind,” which features lyrics by the amazing Savannah, GA native, Johnny Mercer. I am also very fond of Sinatra’s groovy take on Tony Hatch’s timeless “Call Me.” The album’s only clunker is “Downtown.” Yes, the same tune that Petula Clark rode to the top of the pops. It just doesn’t click in Sinatra’s hands and, frankly, he seems a little annoyed during the take.

But why focus on the negative when there is so much winning material here. The bonus live tracks are fun, but it’s the studio cuts that you will come back to time and time again. Nelson Riddle’s arrangement work is spot on and future star Glen Campbell even played rhythm guitar on the title track. Betcha didn’t know that!

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — “Strangers in the Night” was Frank Sinatra’s best-selling single and — between the single and its namesake album — the recipient of four Grammy Awards including Record of the Year in 1966. But it almost didn’t get to market in time, with Bobby Darin and Jack Jones cutting the song at the same time. Sinatra’s version was the hit, displacing the Beatles’ “Paperback Writer” to the #2 position in 1966 and proving the biggest hit of his career. The album shot to the top of the charts as well. Even in the rock ’n’ roll era, nine-time Grammy recipient Frank Sinatra was still the Chairman and one of the most important musical figures of the 20th Century, selling more than 27 million CDs in the SoundScan era alone.

On January 26, 2010, Concord Records, on license from Frank Sinatra Enterprises (FSE), will release Strangers in the Night: Deluxe Edition, a digitally remastered reissue of Sinatra’s classic album featuring three bonus tracks and liner notes by Ken Barnes. The deluxe edition contains all ten of the original Reprise Records album’s songs as well as three previously unreleased additions: “Strangers in the Night” and “All or Nothing at All,” both recorded live at Budokan Hall in Tokyo in the ’80s, and an alternate take of “Yes Sir, That’s My Baby” from the original 1966 album sessions.

The Strangers in the Night album was arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle (with the title track arranged by Ernie Freeman). Sonny Burke was the album’s producer, with the exception of the title track, which was produced by Jimmy Bowen, theretofore known primarily for his work in rock ’n’ roll and country. German composer/arranger Burt Kaempfert, known for his production of the Beatles’ first commercial recordings in the very early ’60s, had supplied theme music for the James Garner film A Man Could Get Killed called “Strangers in the Night.” Within days, Bobby Darin and Jack Jones were both recording it. But Bowen heard it as a hit for Sinatra and instantly set up a session to record just that song (most sessions would produce four songs at a time). Sinatra was not initially crazy about the song, but trusted Bowen’s judgment. It wasn’t long before the trust was justified.

Within hours of final mixing, Bowen sent acetates of the song to key radio stations —by private planes. The extravagance paid off, but not overnight. Two months later, the song broke big in the U.K. and a month later, on July 2, 1966, it hit #1 in the U.S. and in every major territory, becoming the biggest record of Sinatra’s career.

The rest of the Strangers in the Night album was recorded in two May 1966 sessions with longtime producer Burke again at the helm and Riddle arranging. The songs were primarily classic standards with a few of them reflecting the current scene. But as annotator Barnes points out, there was no attempt to appeal to teenage America, other than that some of the songs came from Sinatra’s own teenage years: Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn’s “My Baby Cares for Me” from 1928, Donaldson’s “You’re Driving Me Crazy” from 1930, and “Yes Sir, That’s My Baby,” also by Donaldson and Kahn, from 1925. Also included was Rodgers & Hart’s “The Most Beautiful Girl in the World” from the 1935 musical Jumbo. Apart from the album’s title track, the most important song on the album was a German tune with English lyrics by Johnny Mercer, “Summer Wind,” which reached #1 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart.

Two British songs, both popularized by Petula Clark, “Call Me” and “Downtown,” were a nod to current tastes, as was Alan Jay Lerner’s “On a Clear Day,” one of the better show tunes of its period.

Ken Barnes observes, “Despite a marked stylistic difference between the title song and the rest of the tracks, Strangers in the Night became Sinatra’s most commercially successful album. He had dealt with the new pop age spectacularly — and on his own terms.”

www.concordmusicgroup.com/albums/strangers-in-the-night

Chattanooga Bakery’s MoonPie Crunch Mint

29 Jan

Be sure to stock up for your 2010 MARDI GRAS celebration …

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn., Nov. 19 /PRNewswire/ — Chattanooga Bakery, Inc., maker of the iconic MoonPie brand marshmallow sandwich, announces the introduction of MoonPie Crunch Mint, scheduled for first shipment in November 2009. Chattanooga Bakery also announces the unveiling of its newly-designed web site (www.moonpie.com) which, among other things, will allow consumers to order the new MoonPie Crunch Mint products as well as the full array of other MoonPie products.

Sized like today’s “Mini” MoonPie, the MoonPie Crunch Mint product touts a creamy Mint filling, a crunchier, chocolate-flavored cookie and a chocolatey coating on the outside. Mint will become the second item in the new MoonPie Crunch line, following the launch of Peanut Butter in September 2008. Consumer research results on Mint have been very encouraging, with most comparing it favorably to the ever-popular Girl Scout Thin Mint cookies.

“We’re really excited to be launching another new and different item under the proven MoonPie® trademark,” said Tory Johnston, VP of Marketing for Chattanooga Bakery. “For over 90 years, we stayed true to our original design – soft cookies with marshmallow filling. With the early successes we’ve seen on Peanut Butter, we’re hopeful Mint will also deliver on the taste and quality expectations our consumers demand. It’s encouraging to hear the positive comments on the Crunch line so far – Mint is next, with more in the pipeline.”

MoonPie Crunch Mint will be available in the exact same formats as Peanut Butter – an 8 ct. multipack carton, a 48/8 ct. floor display and a twin pack for single-serve, available in a 12 ct. shelf / counter caddie and 96 ct. floor display.

MoonPies are available in three sizes (Original, Double-Decker® and Mini) and six flavors (Chocolate, Vanilla, Banana, Lemon, Orange & Strawberry). Distribution is national, with particular strength in the Southeast and Southwest. The brand can be found in Grocery, Mass, Club, Drug, Convenience, Vending, Foodservice and a number of specialty retail outlets. The MoonPie products are typically merchandised in the cookie section of stores.

Chattanooga Bakery was founded in 1902 as a subsidiary of the Mountain City Flour Mill. A fourth generation, family-owned business, the company made nearly 100 snack cake and cookie items under the Lookout(TM) trademark, named after the popular residential and tourist community near Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain. In 1917, after a brainstorming conversation between a bakery salesman and some Appalachian coal miners, the MoonPie® was born, and by the late 1930’s was the bakery’s #1 seller, a spot it still occupies today.

Web Site: www.moonpie.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/moonpie