Archive | 11:22 pm

Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day

28 Oct

There’s nothing like the smell of freshly baked bread to fill a kitchen with warmth, eager appetites, and endless praise for the baker who took on such a time-consuming task. Now, you can fill your kitchen with the irresistible aromas of a French bakery every day with just five minutes of active preparation time, and Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day will show you how.

 

Co-authors Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François prove that bread baking can be easier than a trip to the bakery. Their method is quick and simple, bringing forth scrumptious perfection in each loaf. Delectable creations will emerge straight from your own oven as warm, indulgent masterpieces that you can finally make for yourself. In exchange for a mere five minutes of your time, your breads will rival those of the finest bakers in the world.

With nearly 100 recipes to put this ingenious technique to use, Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day will open the eyes of any potential baker who has sworn off homemade bread as simply too much work. Crusty baguettes, mouth-watering pizzas, hearty sandwich loaves, and even buttery pastries can easily become part of your own personal menu, and this innovative book will teach you everything you need to know.

Jeff & Zoe demonstrate in the clip found below.

Buy this amazing book!

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Girl Scores Goal at Randy’s Donuts

28 Oct

This is funny stuff. Watch the urban mayhem transpire at L.A. landmark.

Pimento Cheese & Tupelo Honey

28 Oct

We had some really good eats while we were in Apalachicola. The area is famous for its Tupelo honey, but the beekeepers all seem to be located quite a few miles north of town. However, I did some web research and found that Watkins Tupelo Honey was available at the Piggly Wiggly located just a few blocks west of our bed and breakfast. I picked up a pound — not cheap at about $7 — and found it to be extremely sweet and fresh tasting. This Tupelo honey appeared lighter in color and a little more cloudy (less clear)than the traditional store-bought clover honey. If you’ve ever eaten fresh honey with the comb, you’ll have a general idea of the taste of Tupelo honey. It has a slight floral aftertaste — and I mean that in a positive way. Van Morrison once sang, “She’s as sweet as Tupelo honey.” One taste and it all starts to make sense.

 

Although several different Tupelo trees yield large quantities of honey in the southeastern United States, the Apalachicola River basin is well known for its distinctive flavored Tupelo Honey. It is also produced along the Chipola river a tributary to the Apalachicola. The Ochlocknee and Choctahatchee Rivers also produce some tupelo. These areas are the only places in the world where certified Tupelo Honey is produced. This is because of the abundant growth of the white tupelo, Nyssa-ogche, that produces good quality Tupelo Honey.

The white Tupelo Tree as it is most commonly known usually stands 50 to 75 feet tall is 2 to 3 feet in diameter. White Tupelo blooms from early April to early May, depending on the years weather. Black Tupelo, Nyssa biflora blooms in advance of white tupelo and is used to build up bee colony strenght and stores. Black tupelo produces a less desirable honey which will granulate , it is sold as bakery grade honey.

Another taste treat on this trip was the homemade pimento cheese spread we enjoyed at the Gibson Inn’s Avenue Sea. The inn is located on Avenue C, so the chef saw an opportunity to link the restaurant’s name with the local nautical traditions. Now this is no typical hotel restaurant. The chef here (David Carrier) once worked at Napa’s acclaimed French Laundry, but moved here for a simpler life and access to super fresh seafood. Much of the menu has a Southern twist.

We arrived about 5 pm or so on Saturday and found a cozy table in the pub near the big screen TV. The patrons were battling over the remote control, so we sat back & chilled with an ice cold sweet tea (and I do mean SWEET) as the channel flipped back and forth between the Florida State and University of Georgia football games. Both of the “home” teams were winning and it all remained fairly jovial.

The pimento cheese was served with some small slices of crisp toast. The spread was nice and chunky and was speckled with bright red pimento. It was expertly created and gone in a flash. And for those of you not in the know, there is a big difference between homemade and store-bought pimento cheese. Taste and compare and you’ll see what I’m talking about. Here’s a recipe to get you started:

1 pound sharp cheddar cheese

1/2 pound Monterey Jack cheese

2 medium kosher dill pickles

2 cloves of garlic (adjust the amount to suit your taste)

1 4-ounce jar of pimentos (or pimientos, as they are also called), drained

Cut all ingredients except the pimentos into large chunks. (The pimentos are already chopped.) Place all ingredients in a food processor and pulse just long enough to roughly chop. You don’t want to puree the ingredients, just make them pliable for the next step.

Put in large bowl and mix with about 3 good tablespoons of mayonnaise. (Try Duke’s, a Southern brand made in Richmond, Va., that many pimento-cheese aficionados prefer.)

Refrigerate, but set out for 20 to 30 minutes before use.